Martin Grant

August 1, 2014 by  
Filed under Fashion News

Martin Grant doesn’t think fashion is all about him. He only recently took to Instagram. He’s hopeless at name-dropping, though it is well documented that friends like Cate Blanchett and Lee Radziwill have supported him from the outset. And when Cameron Diaz appeared in The Other Woman wearing his dress, the designer did not fire off a single e-mail. Grant figured that those who know, know. It’s about the clothes.

He doesn’t talk up inspirations, either, but he allowed that Resort is about more chic, refined daywear. One key piece was what Grant called the “car door”: a mid-thigh-length, raglan-sleeved coat in washed duchesse satin and neutral colors (black, white, navy, mocha, or bronze). “It’s the perfect nothing, but it’s everything,” the designer remarked. Worn with Grant’s high-waisted slim trousers or even just jeans, it definitely could go almost anywhere.

Favorite graphic flourishes, notably optical checks and polka dots, cropped up on bias-cut skirts, wide trousers, and crisp blouses with a smart triple-cravat detail. One sleeveless black cotton dress featured a dot so large there was room for only half of it. Semicircular silhouettes had more or less swing depending on the fabric: There was a peacoat with a swing back, a shorter “car door” in cotton, and a sleeveless blue viscose dress that balanced sportiness and sexiness. Meanwhile, another Grant signature, the smart little trench, appeared this season in a complexion-flattering shade of nude.
—Tina Isaac-Goizé
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Maison Martin Margiela

July 16, 2014 by  
Filed under Fashion News

The surrealists used to play a game called Exquisite Corpse, in which each artist would contribute an element to an image, fold it over, and pass it on to someone else who would then add his or her bit with no knowledge of what had been done before. At the end of it all, there’d be some screwball composite that would inevitably betray an unpredictable internal logic.

What better analogy for the house of Maison Martin Margiela‘s Artisanal collection is there than the Exquisite Corpse? The recombinant elements of today’s presentation strung together a grab bag of extraordinary bits and pieces that ultimately composed “a collective memory of Haute Couture” (or so claimed the show notes). But, typically, it was not the grandeur but the detritus of Couture—the fabric offcuts, the embroidery
samples—that the collection celebrated.

Artisanal’s modus operandi is alchemy: Turn a bagful of bottle tops into a shimmering skirt, stitch a handful of embroidered Van Gogh irises into an exotic sheath dress, and collage swatches of cashmere collected at trade fairs into a caftan. Or sew a mess of coins “sourced in various dressing-table drawers and from flea markets across Paris and Brussels” onto a flimsy wrap of fabric to make a jingly-jangly gypsy skirt. The ingenuity was enthralling; the fetishistic detailing of every hour, every bead or sequin slightly less so than usual, perhaps because the collection itself felt a little thin to begin with. It may be simply that the novelty has worn off. Or else the clothes themselves were less enthralling, more arbitrary than before. That was definitely the case with the lobster embroideries and the aluminum “I Love You” party balloon re-created as a crystal bustier.

And yet there was still a peculiar, irresistible romance in these clothes. A Paul Poiret coat trimmed into a gilet, a Line Vautrin brooch on a white cotton shirt…it’s like wearing history, which is, in a way, what Artisanal is all about. But it comes with a condition: You have to impose your history on the history of the materials.
—Tim Blanks
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Maison Martin Margiela

May 23, 2014 by  
Filed under Fashion News

Marion Cotillard turned up at the Cannes Film Festival earlier this week in a minidress from Maison Martin Margiela‘s Artisanal collection, densely embroidered from neckline to hem with multicolor buttons, crystals, and various other doodads. By and large, the label’s new Resort collection is far less embellished, but the lab-coated designers in the MMM studios can’t resist making their tweaks. A sweater is never just a sweater, instead it’s a little pink mohair knit with detachable shrug sleeves. Jackets, as smartly tailored as usual, feature linings that peek out from lapels and sleeves, or entire second jackets that can be layered or worn separately. Pants were mostly left alone—why mess with a good thing? But skirts were a different story; one leather style was actually a vest worn inside out and snapped around the waist over black stirrup pants.

The MMM ethos is to challenge expectations. They created “summer fur” by quilting raffia for a bomber jacket, and turned tweed into a warm-weather fabric by weaving laminated threads. But if they’re fashion intellectuals, it’s not only about experimentation for experimentation’s sake. They also like to have their fun. The girl who wears their glass-beaded backless bib and tuxedo pants on the red carpet is guaranteed to have plenty fun of her own.
—Nicole Phelps
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MM6 Maison Martin Margiela

September 10, 2013 by  
Filed under Fashion News

Our review will be posted shortly. See the complete collection by clicking the image at left.
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MM6 Maison Martin Margiela

February 11, 2013 by  
Filed under Fashion News

Our review will be posted shortly. See the complete collection by clicking the image at left.
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Maison Martin Margiela

January 23, 2013 by  
Filed under Fashion News

Our review will be posted shortly. See the complete collection by clicking the image at left.
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Maison Martin Margiela

January 18, 2013 by  
Filed under Fashion News

Our review will be posted shortly. See the complete collection by clicking the image at left.
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Maison Martin Margiela

August 2, 2012 by  
Filed under Fashion News

Raf Simons’ presence in the front row at Maison Martin Margiela‘s first couture week runway show caused a stir. One editor wondered aloud if it meant that the mystery man himself, a friend of Simons’, had returned to the label that bears his name. That’s not likely, but this 15-look “Artisanal” collection, as the house calls it, was founded on one of Margiela’s signature fixations: reclaiming vintage clothes, accessories, and other objects (remember his household furniture show from Fall 2006?) and reworking them by hand into new pieces.

The raw cotton sleeveless jacket that opened the show was modeled after a 1905 tailcoat, its closure a crystal doorknob found in New York City. An antique silk gown beaded in an Art Nouveau motif was transformed into a long, quilted bomber jacket. And a bolero and vest constructed from vintage baseball gloves and a coat made from a windsurfing sail added a surreal touch.

The focus was on the upper half of the body. For the lower half, the design team sourced lace from all over France to make simple straight-leg trousers that acted as a canvas for the action above. The models went incognito behind masks (another old Margiela trope) embroidered with hundreds of crystals. There was no shortage of beads or lace either, but nonetheless the presentation acted as an avant-garde (and eco-friendlier) antidote to the shows that preceded it this week. A welcome addition to the couture schedule.
—Nicole Phelps
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