Jasmin Shokrian

May 18, 2014 by  
Filed under Fashion News

For nearly a decade, Jasmin Shokrian has been quietly creating thoughtful clothes that reflect her interest in the arts. This season, she reported that sales of her Spring ’14 collection are up by 300 percent—all thanks to a white T-shirt that read “Je pars habiter a Los Angeles.” The success of that relatively simple, Instagram-able top (in English, it says, “I want to live in Los Angeles”) got the designer thinking about the split-second attention span that social media fosters by bombarding us with thousands of images a day. At a Fall preview, Shokrian wondered, “How do we differentiate our own memories from things we’ve visually absorbed now?” She addressed that idea with a cerebral video starring Malu Byrne that strings together fragmented quotes such as “People’s memories are maybe the fuel they burn to stay alive” from Haruki Murakami’s novel After Dark.

For Fall, Shokrian revisited the wordplay of her popular T-shirt on pullovers and tote bags splashed with “Arte Povera,” a tribute to the mid-century modern art movement that partially inspired her this season. She went on to cite Persian architecture and the particular black-blue shade of caviar from the Caspian Sea as additional influences. All of this played out in a range of sculptural navy pieces (many of which were cut from a terrific silk faille that resembled technical nylon), which articulated Shokrian’s fascination with shapes. Highlights included a slightly retro swing coat, wool wrap skirts, and dressy culottes that would look nice at a cocktail event. Compared with recent outings, there was a sportier vibe here exemplified by organza sweatshirts, sweatpants trousers, and a windbreaker jacket. Many of the looks were finished off with a statement-making bucket hat (watch out, Pharrell) that doubled as a daytime clutch. Only time will tell whether it will become as popular as Shokrian’s Los Angeles tops.
—Brittany Adams
Runway Feed

Jasmin Shokrian Draft No. 17

May 3, 2013 by  
Filed under Fashion News

Los Angeles designer Jasmin Shokrian launched Draft No. 17, a line focused on reinterpreting her signature sculptural silhouettes at a lower price point, back in 2009. At a presentation of the new Fall range, the designer explained that while Draft is commercially viable, she misses working with luxurious textured fabrics and intricate handcrafted details. As a result, she’s decided to elevate the quality and construction of the diffusion collection. It paid off: The clothes may wind up being pricier, but their special feel will speak to her customers.

Shokrian’s intention was “to create clothes that meet at the intersection of order and chaos.” Those contradictory concepts harmonized in pieces like midi skirts that merged sturdy canvas with soft pleats, as well as cape-sleeve jackets that were simultaneously tailored and cocoon-shaped. Shokrian breathed new life into hallmarks such as judo pants, kimono dresses, and circular blouses, which had a stricter sensibility this time around. Outerwear was a surprising highlight. The boyish double-breasted peacoat and a petal-pink cashmere vest that stood away from the body and tapered all the way down were particular standouts.
—Brittany Adams
Runway Feed

Jasmin Shokrian

October 12, 2012 by  
Filed under Fashion News

Jasmin Shokrian celebrated the tenth anniversary of her brand last season. So it’s only fitting that this time out, as she commenced a new decade in business, she expand her design horizons. This collection wasn’t a sea change for Shokrian, but it did see her digging deeper into the things she loves and challenging herself to incorporate some stuff she hates. There was a nice sense of tension here. As far as the “loves” go, Shokrian found several ways to elaborate her signature karate pant shape, adapting the style into a jumpsuit, skirt, and particularly good-looking knee-length shorts. She also worked up new iterations of the envelope dress construction she debuted last season; here, she made the look more skin-baring and sexy, in keeping with the collection’s overarching themes of plunging necklines and provocative cutouts. As for “hate,” it’s the word she used to describe her feelings about her palette’s two pop colors, kelly green and neon pink. Still, the pink was especially fresh-making, both as a highlighting detail and in a full garment such as a short plastic anorak. All in all, this was a typically sound effort from Shokrian and an unusually fun one.
—Maya Singer
Runway Feed